Senate.Gov. The United States Senate
Find Your Senators
 
Search
SenatorsCommitteesLegislation and RecordsArts and HistoryVisitorsReference
The United States CapitolTelegraphSenate Floor
Virtual Reference Desk
Public Disclosure
Nominations
Statistics and Lists
Civil Rights at 50
Charles Sumner, 1874
Commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Civil War Sesquicentennial
The Great Uprising of the North--An Anniversary Picture--April 12, 1862.
In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, a continuing series of online features explores the Senate's wartime experience.
This Week in Senate History
Thomas Jefferson by Thomas Sully
April 16, 1789

In adopting its first code of rules, the Senate borrowed heavily from rules drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 for the Continental Congress.

More»
2014 Session Schedule
Scheduled Hearings
Active Legislation
Votes
Floor Schedule


Monday, Apr 28, 2014

2:00 p.m.: Convene and begin a period of morning business.

5:30 p.m.: Proceed to executive session to consider nominations.


Previous Meeting

Friday, Apr 11, 2014

The Senate convened at 4:00 p.m. and adjourned at 4:14 p.m. No record votes were taken.


Daily Digest(latest issue)


Senate Calendar(latest issue)


Executive Calendar(latest issue, PDF format)


Floor Activity
View the previous legislative day's Floor Activity.

Material Culture of the Senate

Dictionaries define "material culture" as the "the physical objects created by a culture; the buildings, tools, and other artifacts created by the members" of a particular group, society or agency. Many of these tools and artifacts we take for granted, but such objects are valuable components of any institution's history.


Desk, Senate Chamber

U.S. Senate Financial Clerk's safe

Image: Willard Clock (Cat. no. 54.00002)

The Senate's material culture includes the historic desks in the Senate Chamber, the unique ivory gavel used by the presiding officer, and the stately Ohio Clock. Some items are institutional in purpose, such as the Senate seal, while others are closely connected to specific individuals or events. They might be as small as a snuff box, as inconspicuous as the pineapple fixture, or as large and prominent as the majestic Eagle and Shield, but they are all components of the Senate's story. The preservation of this material culture exemplifies the Senate's respect for history and tradition.

Past Feature Articles

Capitol Tours
Photo Capitol Hill

FOR INFORMATION ON CAPITOL TOURS, PLEASE CALL 202-226-8000

The visitors page is your source for information on Capitol tours, maps of the area and visiting Washington, D.C.