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Room Histories

The U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee. Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate by the Senate Historical Office and Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2009.

This elegant space located on the first floor of the U.S. Capitol has been home to the Senate Committee on Appropriations since 1911. This brochure contains a brief history of the rooms in the suite, the committee and its chairmen, and the murals that adorn the committee's walls.

The Brumidi Corridors. Prepared under the direction of the U.S. Senate Commission on Art by the Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2006.

The Brumidi Corridors are richly painted hallways on the first floor of the Senate wing of the Capitol. Designed and painted by Italian artist Constantino Brumidi and his assistants, the halls are decorated with classically inspired images and symbolic representations of American culture. This brochure introduces the artist and highlights the various thematic sections of the corridors he painted.

The U.S. Senate Democratic Leader's Suite. Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2007.

The Democratic Leader's Suite is located across the hall from the Senate Chamber. This brochure highlights the history of the suite and the various decorative elements adorning its rooms.

The U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate by the Senate Historical Office and Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2009.

Established in 1816, the Foreign Relations Committee is one of the 10 original standing committees of the Senate. Found within this pamphlet are a brief history of the committee, short biographies of selected committee chairmen, and a list of rooms where the committee has been located.

The Kennedy Caucus Room. Senate Historical Office. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2010.

The Kennedy Caucus Room of the Russell Senate Office Building is one of the grandest and most historic rooms in the nation’s capital.

The Lyndon Baines Johnson Room. Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate by the Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1997.

The Lyndon Baines Johnson Room was originally built as the Senate Library reading room as part of the 1859 Senate extension to the Capitol. It retains many of its original features, including murals by Constantino Brumidi, a marble mantel, and Minton floor tiles. This brochure offers a brief history of the room and its decorative elements.

The Old Senate Chamber, 1810-1859. Prepared under the direction of the U.S. Senate Commission on Art by the Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2009.

During its residence in this chamber from 1810 to 1859, the Senate grew from a small advisory council to the primary forum for the great national debates of the mid-19th century--an era known as the Senate's "Golden Age." The brochure provides a brief overview of some of the historical events that occurred in the room, as well as an overview of its architecture and art.

The Old Supreme Court Chamber, 1810-1860. Prepared under the direction of the U.S. Senate Commission on Art by the Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2002.

Located on the ground floor of the original north wing of the Capitol, this space first served as the Senate Chamber (1800-1808), then as the Supreme Court Chamber (1810-1860). This brochure tells the story of the Old Supreme Court Chamber by highlighting several historical events as well as the art and architecture of the chamber.

The President's Room. Prepared under the direction of the U.S. Senate Commission on Art by the Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2002.

In 1789 President George Washington wrote to the U.S. Senate recommending a chamber "for the joint business of the President and the Senate." Although the Capitol's early architects planned for such a room, it was not until extensions were added to the building in the 1850s that one was finally built. Providing a brief history of the room, this brochure is a look behind the doors of one of the Capitol's most stunning rooms.

The U.S. Senate Republican Leader's Suite. Prepared under the direction of the U.S. Senate Commission on Art by the Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2007.

The Republican Leader's Suite is located in the oldest section of the U.S. Capitol. Over the past 200 years, it has been rebuilt and modified many times and used for many different purposes. This brochure highlights the history of the suite and its occupants.

United States Capitol Room S-219. Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate by the Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2002.

Built as part of the extension of the Capitol in the 1850s, Room S-219 has been used over the years by the Senate Appropriations Committee, Official Reporters of Debates, and Secretary of the Senate. Highlighted in this brochure are a brief history of the room's occupants and an overview of its architectural and decorative features.

United States Senate Chamber, 1859-2009. U.S. Senate Historical Office. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2009.

For 150 years the Senate has occupied its current Chamber in the United States Capitol, a room that has witnessed some of the most significant events in American history. United States Senate Chamber, 1859-2009 looks at the history of the room through its first 150 years.

The Strom Thurmond Room. Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate by the Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2002.

Named for Senator Strom Thurmond in 1991, this room exemplifies the Capitol's long and varied history. Found within this brochure is a history of the room, including a list of its many occupants and an overview of the room's decorative elements.

The Senate Vestibule. Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate by the Office of Senate Curator and Senate Historical Office. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2002.

The Senate Vestibule served as the main entrance to the Capitol in 1800. Highlighted in this brochure is the history of this space and its fascinating architectural and artistic characteristics.

The Vice President's Room. Prepared under the direction of the U.S. Senate Commission on Art by the Office of Senate Curator. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2002.

Under the U.S. Constitution the vice president of the United States serves as president of the Senate. For over 125 years, the Vice President's Room has provided a convenient and elegant Capitol working space for the vice president.

The Art & History bibliography lists more literature about the U.S. Senate and U.S. Capitol.