Senate Buildings
 

The Dirksen Senate Office Building.
http://www.senate.gov/visiting/common/generic/dirksen_building_description.htmSenate Historical Office. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2006.

The federal government’s expanded role nationally and internationally beginning in the 1930s raised new issues for senatorial action, which in turn required increased staff assistance and created crowded conditions in the Capitol and the original Senate Office Building. In 1941, the U.S. Senate authorized the Architect of the Capitol to prepare plans for the creation of a second office building. The plans were approved in 1949 and construction started in 1956 with the doors opening for business on October 15, 1958. The Dirksen Senate Office Building brochure provides a brief overview of the building's history.

The Hart Senate Office Building.
http://www.senate.gov/visiting/common/generic/hart_building_description.htmSenate Historical Office. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2006.

Sweeping legislative reorganization during the 1970s expanded the Senate staff and stimulated construction of a third office building, named for Michigan senator Philip A. Hart. The Hart Senate Office Building brochure provides a brief overview of the building's history.

The Russell Senate Office Building: The First Century, 1909-2009.
http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/RSOB.htmSenate Historical Office. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2009.

The 20th century brought new states, new members, and a burgeoning staff to cope with the increased legislative workload. The need for working space in the Capitol grew accordingly. In 1909 the Senate Office Building was opened. The brochure, The Russell Senate Office Building: The First Century, 1909-2009 provides an overview of the history of the building.

The Art & History bibliography lists more literature about the U.S. Senate and the U.S. Capitol.